2016 programme

During the festival we're fundraising to support free outdoor learning lessons for Orkney schools - please consider donating here!

 

In brief...

Monday 16 May

Snorkelling safari with Scapa Scuba

Sketching Berriedale with Tim Wootton SWLA 

Wild Orkney on the big screen at the Pickaquoy Centre

Into the Gloup organised by the RSPB Local Group (full)

The how and why of bird sounds with Professor Peter Slater

 

Tuesday 17 May

Imagining the lost birds of Papay with the Papay Ranger and Professor Peter Slater: due to local circumstances this event has unfortunately had to be cancelled

Renga workshop with the George MacKay Brown Fellowship 

Into the Gloup organised by the RSPB Local Group (full)

 

Wednesday 18 May

Re: Peat with the Orkney Field Club

Citizen science project with the International Centre for Island Technology (Orkney Campus)

Orkney’s Loch Ness monster with the International Centre for Island Technology (Orkney Campus)

 

Thursday 19 May

Bird ringing demo with the Orkney Ringing Group: cancelled due to wind forecast

Sea eagles: the story so far with Tomb of the Eagles and RSPB Scotland

Sea-watching at Hoxa Head with RSPB Scotland: cafe currently closed due to illness but we will be going ahead with our sea-watch

 

Friday 20 May

Spotlight on seabirds with RSPB Scotland

Photography at sunset with Charles Tait (full, waiting list available)

 

Saturday 21 May

Beachcombing and sea-watching with the Sanday Ranger (full except for those not requiring transport, waiting list available)

Wildlife from the water with the Kirkwall Kayak Club (full, waiting list available)

Crafty drop-in day for all the family at the Pier Arts Centre

Children’s creative writing workshop with the Wirdsmit Young Writers Group

Listen at The Loons with RSPB Scotland

 

Sunday 22 May

Nature Festival service at St Magnus Cathedral

The 2016 Nature Festival cruise with NorthLink Ferries

 

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Stromness Museum by the shore, Sunday 15 May

 

 

Monday 16 May

Snorkelling safari with Scapa Scuba

When: 10 am - 1 pm, 12-3 pm, 2-5 pm (three sessions available)

Where: Churchill Barrier No. 3, weather permitting, or another sheltered location

Price: £35, booking required

Website: www.scapascuba.co.uk

Explore the magical world below the waves - kelp forests, bright sea creatures and rusting wrecks.

Snorkelling is a relaxing and mesmerising experience. Floating gently on the surface, you’ll be amazed at the wealth of sea life around you in these shallow waters, including crabs, anemones, starfish, sea urchins and many fish including wrasse and ling. Nearby lie three Blockship wrecks - the Empire Seaman, the Martis and the Gartshore.

These sessions, at a special Nature Festival rate, include an introduction to snorkelling and the creatures living around the Barriers. All equipment will be provided, including dry suits. It should be possible to spend up to 1.5 hours in the water, although you’re welcome to come out sooner.

No previous snorkelling experience required. You can take the session at your own pace with close support from PADI Instructors and Divemasters. There’s no need to be a strong swimmer as the Churchill Barriers are very sheltered.  You would, however, need to be comfortable around the water.

Suitable for ages 10+, all children must be accompanied (though accompanying adults can stay on the beach). Parking is at a roadside lay-by. There is a grassy bank down to the stony beach, which can be slippery with seaweed.

 

Sketching Berriedale with Tim Wootton SWLA

When: 10.30 am - 4.30 pm (excluding travel to Hoy)

Where: RSPB Scotland Hoy nature reserve, Hoy

Price: £20, booking required

Website: tim-wootton.blogspot.co.uk, rspb.org.uk/hoy

Join local artist Tim Wootton and the RSPB Scotland warden for a relaxed sketching workshop in the magical surroundings of Berridale – Britain’s most northerly native woodland, a remnant of the ancient forest that once covered Orkney.

After a short minibus ride to the lovely Rackwick Bay, we’ll head out through the valley between Ward Hill and Cuilags, where a rough track known as the Old Post Road leads between these two giants. After less than a mile we turn off and cross a stream to reach the cool, mossy shade of Berriedale, where honeysuckle drapes the branches, with ferns, wild roses, blaeberry and wood sage below. Robins, willow warblers and chaffinches nest here and the outlying willows shelter stonechats and reed buntings.

You can work in whichever materials you choose, with support from Tim and with Lee on hand to help you delve deeper into the natural history of the area. (Further advice on materials to bring available if desired.)

Tim is a distinguished local artist, having won Wildscape Magazine's Wildlife Artist of the Year 2008 (Editor's category), BBC Wildlife Magazine Wildlife Artist of the Year, 2010 (World Birds category), and Birdwatch / Swarovski Artist of the Year, 2011.

All ages welcome. All walking will be at a gentle pace, although the route to Berriedale is rough and potentially slippery, including a stream crossing. We’ll retrace our steps at the end of the day for the minibus ride back to the pier. For travel information, visit www.orkneyferries.co.uk.

 

Wild Orkney on the big screen at the Pickaquoy Centre

When: 5.30-6.45 pm (doors open at 5 pm)

Where: Pickaquoy Centre, Kirkwall

Price: free, no need to book

Website: www.pickaquoy.co.uk

Enjoy a free screening of four 15-minute films that capture stunning wildlife footage across spring, summer, autumn and winter in Orkney.

These films were completed just last year by award-winning wildlife cameraman Raymond Besant and acclaimed Stromness-based film editor Mark Jenkins, with music composed by local musician James Watson. They were commissioned from Cinécosse through RSPB Scotland’s Enjoy Wild Orkney project, funded by the RSPB, the Heritage Lottery Fund and the European Regional Development Fund.

The cinema includes wheelchair bays and a hearing loop – please contact the Pickaquoy team on 01856 879900 with any questions about these facilities or to reserve a bay. The cinema kiosk open for purchasing drinks and snacks. 

 

Into the Gloup organised by the RSPB Local Group

When: 7-9 pm (return time approximate)

Where: Skaill, Deerness

Price: £15, booking required

Venture into the Deerness Gloup by small boat, the best way to experience this magnificent sea cave with an opening in the roof.

The trip promises a range of wildlife to spot - nesting seabirds clamour from the cliffs all along this stretch of coast and on the return journey we’ll pass a common seal colony. 

Suitable for those aged 7 and over. Seating on board is uncovered, and boarding involves a slight step up/down between the boat and the pier with the boatman on hand to assist. Please note this event is particularly weather dependent.

 

The how and why of bird sounds with Professor Peter Slater

When: 7.30 pm

Where: The Hostel, Papa Westray

Price: £3, u16s £1, no need to book

Learn about the fascinating world of bird song in this evening talk by Peter Slater, former Professor of Natural History and current President of the Orkney Field Club. 

 

Tuesday 17 May

Imagining the lost birds of Papay with the Papay Ranger and Professor Peter Slater

When: 10 am - late (excluding travel to Papa Westray)

Where: Papa Westray

Price: £40, booking required

Website: www.papawestray.co.uk

Explore this magical island by ear in the company of Papay Ranger and artist, Jonathan Ford, and Professor Peter Slater, bird song expert. 

Once home to one of Britain’s last great auks, Papay has more recently faced dwindling numbers of Arctic terns and corncrakes. Over the course of the day we’ll explore the island’s changed and changing soundscape with a focus on these three species.

Our schedule will be flexible to make the most of the day’s weather but you can look forward to the following activities, with a break for a warming lunch and homebakes at the Papa Westray Hostel.

Record the sounds of existing seabirds on Papay, using techniques and tools formerly used in bird catching on the Northern Isles, to add to the ongoing archive of seabird life on the island.

Recreate the calls of Papay’s Arctic terns, taking the island back to its not-so-distant past when there was a colony of 5,000 breeding birds.

Reimagine and record a voice for the great auk, using it’s closest living relative the razorbill as starting point. 

Carry out a corncrake survey, which will introduce the techniques of listening for and locating these elusive birds, with archive recordings on hand to aid detection. 

Enjoy an evening of tales and song concerning the great auk, Arctic terns and corncrakes, shared by current islanders with first-hand memories and stories of the birds that used to be common here, with a chance to see the 3-D film of Papay’s last great auk, now held in the Natural History Museum, and other archive footage of the lost birds of Papay. 

All ages welcome. We’d recommend booking accommodation on Papay to be able to join in with the full day and evening’s activities. Rooms are available in the comfortable community-run hostel, with camping space outside - please arrange accommodation at the time of booking. The day will involved some walking over varied terrain, at a gentle pace.

Travel information available at www.loganair.co.uk and www.orkneyferries.co.uk. If you're passing through Westray, consider spending some time on this wonderful island too - for information about its wildlife and archaeology, and tours available, visit westraypapawestray.co.uk/westray.

 

Renga workshop with the George MacKay Brown Fellowship

When: 10 am-3 pm

Where: RSPB Scotland Cottascarth and The Loons, West Mainland

Price: free, booking required

Website: gmbfellowship.org.uk, www.rspb.org.uk/cottascarth, www.rspb.org.uk/theloons

Renga is a Japanese poetry form that is 1000 years old. This renga, led by writer Yvonne Gray, will take place in two locations surrounded by the sights and sounds of the natural world: the RSPB Scotland hides at Cottascarth, Rendall and The Loons, Birsay. 

Creating a renga is a shared process. Beginning with the first verse or hokku (from which the Japanese haiku form originated) our renga will grow to 20 verses contributed by participants, following the cycle of seasons.

You are welcome to drop in and out of the process as desired - depending on the weather you may wish to bring a picnic and flask or plan to take a break in the middle of the day to visit a nearby cafe (and toilets, as there are none at the hides).

All ages welcome. Any walking during the day will be at a gentle pace and adapted to the wishes of the group. We’ll change location during the day, so if you don’t have access to a car or bike to get around please get in touch with the Nature Festival team and we will try to facilitate car sharing. In the event of bad weather, we may adapt the plan to make use of some warmer, indoor writing locations.

The Cottascarth hide is about 600 m from the reserve car park, which includes one accessible parking space. Two thirds of the track is gravel with the final section grass, which is less even and can be muddy following wet weather. The Loons hide has an on-road car park next to it. We may walk or drive the short distance along the road to the outdoor Listening Wall near The Loons hide, where there are also on-road parking spaces. Both hides and the Listening Wall are wheelchair accessible.

 

Into the Gloup organised by the RSPB Local Group

When: 8-10 pm (return time approximate)

Where: Skaill, Deerness

Price: £15, booking required

Venture into the Deerness Gloup by small boat, the best way to experience this magnificent sea cave with an opening in the roof.

The trip promises a range of wildlife to spot - nesting seabirds clamour from the cliffs all along this stretch of coast and on the return journey we’ll pass a common seal colony. 

Suitable for those aged 7 and over. Seating on board is uncovered, and boarding involves a slight step up/down between the boat and the pier with the boatman on hand to assist. Please note this event is particularly weather dependent.

 

Wednesday 18 May

Re: Peat with the Orkney Field Club

When: 2-4 pm

Where: RSPB Scotland Birsay Moors nature reserve, West Mainland

Price: free, booking required

Website: www.orkneycommunities.co.uk/fieldclub

Orkney Field Club invite you to explore peatbanks - old and new. We will be looking at what peat is made of, what lives in it, on it and around it.

All ages welcome. Walking will cover no more than a mile but includes very wet, uneven ground - wellies essential plus warm clothing! Not suitable for dogs apart from assistance dogs.

 

Citizen science project with the International Centre for Island Technology (Orkney Campus)

When: drop-in all day followed by workshop 7-8 pm

Where: Ness Point and Room LL1, the Old Academy, Stromness

Price: free, no need to book

Do diving birds follow the tides? Take part in a trial citizen science project to help find out.

Drop by Ness Point during the day to watch and record the behaviour of diving birds, like shags, in the water. At the end of the day, our results should build up a picture of how feeding varies over the course of the day and changing tidal conditions.

You can record for as little or long as you want. Recording sheets and instructions will be available at the Point from dawn until 6 pm, with assistance and binoculars available to borrow 10 am - 4 pm.

Later, come along for an evening workshop at ICIT exploring your results and the success (or not!) of this trial, including a talk about the hydrodynamics of Orkney waters and the shape of the birds themselves.

All ages welcome. It’s a 1-mile, flat, surfaced walk from the centre of Stromness out to Ness Point, which you can also drive. The watchpoint will be overlooking the water just beyond the Point of Ness campsite (KW16 3DW). ICIT (the Orkney Campus of Heriot-Watt University) is based at the Old Academy, Back Road, Stromness (KW16 3AW) and is wheelchair accessible.

 

Orkney’s Loch Ness monster with the International Centre for Island Technology (Orkney Campus)

When: 8-9 pm

Where: Ness Point and Room LL1, the Old Academy, Stromness

Price: free, no need to book

How long did Arctic char survive in Heldale Water – or were they ever there? ICIT Director Sandy Kerr will explain the mystery of Orkney’s last vertebrate extinction and his attempts to solve it.

All ages welcome. ICIT (the Orkney Campus of Heriot-Watt University) is based at the Old Academy, Back Road, Stromness (KW16 3AW) and is wheelchair accessible.

 

Thursday 19 May

Bird ringing demo with the Orkney Ringing Group: cancelled due to wind forecast

When: 6.30-9.30 am (drop-in)

Where: Olav’s Wood, South Ronaldsay (http://bit.ly/1XvyLcQ)

Price: free, no need to book but weather dependent so check for confirmation the event will go ahead

See birds closer than ever before in the fairytale surroundings of this little-known woodland, and find out how the science of ringing informs conservation.

Did you know that willow warblers (weighing just 9g!) migrate to and from Africa each year, repeatedly coming back after winter to the same small areas to breed in Orkney? Ringing helps uncover these amazing migration patterns alongside much more, for example the survival rates of different species.

All ages welcome. There is roadside parking for several cars with a rough track, potentially muddy, leading a short distance into the wood where the mist netting will take place (exact location to be decided on the morning). We can demonstrate ringing close to the roadside if desired. 

This event is particularly dependent on the weather, so an update on whether we are going ahead will publicised on Tuesday via the Orkney Nature Festival website, Facebook page and Radio Orkney.

 

Sea eagles: the story so far with Tomb of the Eagles and RSPB Scotland

When: 9.30 am-5.30 pm (drop in)

Where: Tomb of the Eagles, Isbister, South Ronaldsay

Price: adults £6.50, concessions £5.50, 13+ £2.50, 5-12s £1.50, u5s free (a £1 discount on normal ticket prices), no need to book

Website: www.tomboftheeagles.co.uk

A special day bringing together sea eagles past and present - from 5,000-year-old bones and talons to the radio technology used to track the latest generation of Scottish sea eagles chicks.

Tomb of the Eagles is one of Orkney’s most intriguing archaeological sites, a 5,000 year old Neolithic tomb. Alongside human bones, it was found to contain the talons and bones of an estimated 14 sea eagles, raising many questions about the significance of these birds in the lives of the people who lived here.

Learn about the Tomb (and the fascinating Bronze Age archaeology also on site) in the visitor centre, with talks and handling of artefacts all day. The RSPB Scotland team will be outside to bring the story up to date, with first hand accounts of the Scottish sea eagle reintroduction project following this species’ national extinction in 1918. Try out radio tracking equipment, handle feathers and recreate a full-size nest.

It’s 1 mile walk to the Tomb along a farm road and grassy (sometimes muddy) paths. The passageway is narrow so to get inside you need to crawl or make use of the skateboard-like trolley provided. The visitor centre has toilets, a hearing loop and is wheelchair accessible. 

 

Sea-watching at Hoxa Head with RSPB Scotland

Cafe currently closed due to illness but we will be going ahead with the sea watch in the garden

When: 11-3 pm (drop in)

Where: Hoxa Tearooms, South Ronaldsay

Price: normal prices in the cafe, no need to book

Website: www.hoxatearooms.co.uk

With a bird’s-eye view over Hoxa Sound, the Tearooms offer a great vantage point for spotting orcas, minkie whales and harbour porpoises. Enjoy some cake while we keep watch!

 

Friday 20 May

Spotlight on seabirds with RSPB Scotland

When: 11 am-4 pm (drop-in)

Where: Marwick Head, West Mainland

Price: free, no need to book

Website: www.rspb.org.uk/marwickhead

Experience Orkney Mainland’s biggest seabird colony – a raucous, bustling city perched on the cliffs – and explore some of the stories and science behind these charismatic birds, from how deep they dive to the technology that lets us know where Orkney birds go to fish.

Guides will be on hand as you enjoy the bay and cliffs at your own pace. Explore the world of zooplankton through a microscope, test a GPS seabird tracker, try your hand at seabird monitoring – or simply pack a picnic and enjoy fantastic views of the west coast. At the top of the cliffs we’ll have telescopes to get you close to the kittiwakes, fulmars, guillemots, razorbills and scattering of puffins that make up the colony. Gannets often dive offshore and we even spot orcas or other whales out to sea.

All ages welcome. It’s about one mile from the bay to the top of the cliffs along a grassy and potentially muddy path, including a fairly steep climb, with opportunities for a longer, circular walks in the area. There’s car parking at Marwick Bay and at additional parking at Cumlequoy (signposted Kitchener Memorial). 

 

Photography at sunset with Charles Tait

When: 8-10 pm

Where: Yesnaby, West Mainland (http://bit.ly/23uVAo5)

Price: free, booking required

Website: www.charles-tait.co.uk

Join Charles Tait for a relaxed exploration of Yesnaby’s many subjects, from dramatic cliffs to tiny Scottish primroses. In particular we’ll look at techniques and equipment for different light effects.

Charles is a professional photographer and travel writer, author of the Orkney Guide Book. All ages and levels of experience welcome - we'll focus on making the most of whatever kit you have to get closer to nature. Yesnaby is a fairly flat area next to the cliffs featuring a range of terrain including uneven rocky areas and potentially muddy, rough tracks. All exploration will be at a gentle pace and adapted to the interests of the group.

The weather will have a big effect on the when the best photography conditions are, so we may get in touch before the event to suggest shifting the times slightly.

 

Saturday 21 May

Beachcombing and sea-watching with the Sanday Ranger

When: 9.15 am – 6.15 pm (excluding travel to Sanday)

Where: Sanday

Price: £35 (Sanday residents not requiring transport £25), booking required

Website: www.sanday.co.uk

Sanday is known for its beautiful bays and beaches. Join the Sanday Ranger Emma Webb to explore and learn more about life at the edge of the sea through lots of hand-on activities. All ages welcome!

For those travelling to Sanday, the ferry leaves Kirkwall at 7:40 am – an early start but a great chance to spot seabirds and perhaps marine mammals from the boat, with Emma already on board to accompany you and give an introductory talk.

Once on Sanday, we’ll use the community minibus for transport throughout the day, starting with an illustrated presentation, coffee and cake at Heilsa Fjold before moving to Roos Wick & the Holms of Ire for sea-watching.

We’ll then head back to Heilsa Fjold for a warming lunch and marine-themed crafts before exploring the beach at Otterswick where we will look for seals and do our beachcombing challenge. 

We will then move over to the more rugged west coast of Sanday to Arye to explore the rockpools – a chance to get close to hermit crabs, sea urchins and sea anenomes and perhaps even a sea slug, squat lobster or scorpion fish!

There will be ample opportunity to make use of the nearby Ayre’s Rock fish and chip shop just before leaving Sanday. For those returning to Mainland, the ferry leaves Sanday at 6.15 pm and gets into Kirkwall at 7.40 pm, and again Emma will be on board for more guided sea-watching.

All food included (except fish and chips). There’ll be some walking over varied terrain, with toilets available at Heilsa Fjold and Ayre’s Rock. You’ll find details of ferry times at www.orkneyferries.co.uk.

 

Wildlife from the water with the Kirkwall Kayak Club

When: 10 am - 1 pm

Where: Houton, West Mainland

Price: £3, booking required

Website: www.orkneycommunities.co.uk/kirkwallkayakclub

Explore this rocky coastline by kayak, where seabirds fish against the dramatic backdrop of the Hoy hills.

We'll look out for shags, red-throated divers and black guillemots on the water, with Arctic terns overhead, colourful seaweed below and the calls of birds all around. Most of all, though, it’s about enjoying the magical experience of being at water level and seeing the coastline from a different perspective,

Qualified instructors from Kirkwall Kayak Club will take care of you throughout the morning and we’ll have tea, coffee and hot chocolate on hand to warm you up afterwards. No experience necessary, though you must be a confident swimmer and prepared to learn how to paddle unaided.

Open to those aged 18 or over. Please note this event is particularly dependent on suitable weather, although we may be able to alter location to adapt to the conditions.

 

Crafty drop-in day for all the family at the Pier Arts Centre

When: 11 am - 4 pm (drop in)

Where: Pier Arts Centre, Stromness

Price: free, no need to book

Website: www.pierartscentre.com

Take inspiration from the natural world as you try your hand at new and traditional crafts, from straw work and knitting to making jewellery from recycled materials.

All ages welcome, u12s must be accompanied by an adult. All materials supplied and the centre is wheelchair accessible.

 

Children’s creative writing workshop with the Wirdsmit Young Writers Group

When: 2-4 pm

Where: RSPB Scotland Cottascarth nature reserve, West Mainland

Price: free, booking required

Join us in this lovely hide nestled in the hillside to learn of the wildlife around it, and how Bessie Skea (an Orcadian writer) loved to explore and capture her love of her natural surroundings in her writings.

Add to that Anne Bignall's beautiful mural featuring the nature and seasonal changes of this hidden gem, and you are sure to find much inspiration.

All will be guided at their own pace in a gentle journey that celebrates each individual’s creative responses.

Suitable for ages 10-14. Children may be left unaccompanied during the workshop once registered (for those not already part of the Wirdsmit group). Accompanying adults are welcome to stay and enjoy the nature reserve and hide too.

For directions to Cottascarth visit rspb.org.uk/cottascarth. The hide is about 600 m from the car park, which includes one accessible parking space. Two thirds of the track is gravel with the final section grass, which is less even and can be muddy following wet weather. The interior of the hide is wheelchair accessible.

 

Listen at The Loons with RSPB Scotland

When: 3-6.30 pm

Where: RSPB Scotland The Loons nature reserve, West Mainland

Price: free, no need to book

Website: rspb.org.uk/theloons

Drop by to drink in the music of waders and wildfowl. We’ll have guides in the wildlife hide and at the unique Listening Wall which overlooks this magical wetland.

The birds will be in a flurry of activity during the breeding season, with lapwings, curlews, redshanks all nesting and calling nearby. Whistling wigeons, singing skylarks and squealing water rails add to the natural symphony, and this is a prime spot for a peregrine or hen harrier swooping through on the hunt.

All ages welcome, and we’ll have tea, coffee and hot chocolate on hand. Both The Loons hide and the Listening Wall have on-road car parking spaces and are wheelchair accessible.

 

Sunday 22 May

Nature Festival service at St Magnus Cathedral

When: 11.15 am

Where: Kirkwall

Price: free, no need to book

Website: www.stmagnus.org

Join the Rev. Fraser Macnaughton to celebrate and reflect on the natural world through the Sunday service. (Look out for the Arctic tern and Scottish primrose in the magnificent stained glass window about the entrance to the cathedral.)

A hearing loop and large-print hymn books are available. Please contact the custodian on 01856 874894 with any other questions about the cathedral.

 

The 2016 Nature Festival cruise with NorthLink Ferries

When: 1-4 pm (check in from 12.15 pm, last boarding 12.45 pm)

Where: NorthLink terminal, Stromness

Price: adults £15, u16s £10, u5s free

Website: www.northlinkferries.co.uk

A unique opportunity to circumnavigate Hoy! Step aboard the Hamnavoe for cliffs teeming with seabirds and sweeping views of the Flow, with wildlife commentary and guides on every deck, live folk music and a buffet of local sustainable produce.

Our route will take us close to many of the small islands within Scapa Flow, passing Cava, Rysa Little, Fara, Flotta and Switha – the last known nesting site of Orkney’s sea eagles in the 19th century, until the recent arrival of the pair currently nesting on Hoy.

We’ll hug the coast past Cantick Head, passing the cliffs of the Scottish Wildlife Trust nature reserve of Hill of White Hamars, and travel up Hoy’s dramatic west coast. Guillemots, razorbills and puffins nest on the cliffs and zip past to feed in the water nearby, with gannets diving and fulmars skimming the waves all around. And on top of spectacular views we’ll hope to spot orcas or minke whales along the way!

All ages welcome, with children’s activities available on board. The Hamnavoe is wheelchair-accessible (more information available at www.northlinkferries.co.uk/on-board/accessibility-options). We may adapt the route if needed to suit sea and weather conditions.

 

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Stromness Museum by the shore

When: Sunday 15 May, 10 am - 5 pm

Where: Stromness Museum, Stromness

Price: free, no need to book

Website: www.stromnessmuseum.co.uk

Taking place just before the Nature Festival, this Festival of Museums open day includes an afternoon of short talks about the nature and culture of the shore, from plants to piers and ballast to bones. All ages welcome. Visit the website for full details.